The Best Gift These CEOs Ever Received?

CEOs were asked: What is the best holiday gift you ever received?

My wife surprised me with a custom set of golf clubs. While I was not into the sport and business was my main focus, it was time to enjoy life. Golf has become one of my sporting passions, plus every banker I knew was into the sport …

That year, we won the Beacon Council inaugural tourney and received a beautiful crystal Tiffany trophy.

Jim AngletonCEO for Aegis FinServ Corp.

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When I was 7, my parents got me an electric race car set. It came in a huge box that was irresistible, so much so that I tore open the wrapping paper to have a peek before Christmas. I then unskillfully closed it back up with masking tape. My parents were not fooled, but they did not punish me. The excitement I felt with that gift has never been matched.

Wael BarsoumM.D., CEO and president of Cleveland Clinic Florida

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The best Christmas gift I ever received was when I proposed to my girlfriend of five years on Christmas Eve, and she said “Yes.” We met while I was bartending at Whistler’s Café in Cutler Ridge Mall. She arrived with an old high school friend, and I proceeded to make them the best strawberry daiquiris in Miami all night. She was teaching aerobics at [a health spa] in South Miami, and we quickly discovered that we were both attending the University of Miami. Shortly after that, I quit the bar scene and got a job at her health club selling memberships. When she refused to date “guys” that she worked with, I moved from that branch to one close by, and she finally relented and agreed to a date. Twenty-eight years later, we are still happily married, with three gorgeous daughters, Ashley, Lauren, and Sofia.

Brett Beveridge, CEO and founder of The Revenue Optimization Companies (T-ROC)

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By far, the best Christmas gift I ever received was the news that I was pregnant with my daughter, Gabriella. I was actually hosting a big Christmas Eve party at my house when I found out I was pregnant. I didn’t know it at the time, but I was having a baby girl and I was ecstatic. Needless to say the best part of that party was my “cookie” baking in the oven! She is 20 years old now, and nothing will ever be able to top that moment.

Jacqueline Dascal Chariffchairman, Continental National Bank and CEO of CosmeticPerks.com

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My kids, Drew and Dominique, gave me a collage of pictures that chronicled the years of their childhood with me. Many of the pictures from that time period had been lost, and these pictures meant the world to me as it showed us as the close family unit that we were. It is one of my most cherished possessions. They are both adults now, and as I get older, I become more sentimental and connected to them.

Bill Diggspresident, The Mourning Family Foundation

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For me, it’s all about effort. Something handmade from my children, something sparkling from my husband. I get as much joy, if not more, out of giving than receiving. There are many ways to show admiration and love. Objects are not what people remember, how you make someone feel is what gets emblazoned in your memory bank. Making the effort to be thoughtful, personal and creative is the ultimate in gift-giving.

Jessica Goldman SrebnickCEO of Goldman Properties and Goldman Global Arts

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For me, Christmas has always been about time. Time with my family, time with my children, time with the people I love most. My wife Melinda blessed me with twins — and every second I spend with them is priceless. They are the most precious gift in my world.

Jorge Gonzalezpresident and CEO, City National Bank

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In the late 1990s, my then-girlfriend, now wife (Chae) and I were attending Arizona State University. I was in New York visiting my family for the Christmas break. My girlfriend was going to visit my family for the first time over the Christmas break — a very big deal. A massive snowstorm hit the East Coast. Although nearly all flights were canceled, she maneuvered her way to Philadelphia. Nearly all roads were closed, but I was able to get to Philadelphia by train to greet my future bride. She met my parents for the first time, on time. Best Christmas gift ever.

Gregory Adam Hailepresident of Broward College

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As a child, the best Christmas gift I was given was a silver Schwinn dirt bike with five-spoke Tuff wheels and a No. 7 plate in front, matching my favorite sports number. My parents gave it to me when I was in the sixth grade. It was the first time I felt our standard of living was improving and it was awesome!

Louis Hernandez Jr., CEO of Black Dragon Capital

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For me, Christmas is about religion and family. I work all year long on deals and loans and tangible things like borrower’s equity, collateral and source of funds. At Christmas, I look to the intangible. No physical present will ever compare to the gift of having my children at Christmas and seeing them grow.

Agostinho Alfonso Macedopresident and CEO of Ocean Bank

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It was a beautiful blessing that weighed approximately six pounds. My wife, Janie, gave birth to our daughter Erin on Christmas Eve in 1993. The gift of life is as beautiful and special as it gets. Erin, as with all of our children, reminds us each day how blessed we all are.

Let me use this opportunity to wish everybody a Happy, Healthy and blessed Holiday Season.

James “Jimmy” Tateco-owner and president of TKA-Evolution Apparel and of Tate Capital, and co-founder of Tate Development Corp.

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The best Christmas gift that I ever received was a King James Bible by my deceased grandmother, Pastor Iver-Lee Baldwin. She advised me life would be hard but as long as I trusted in the Lord. I could get through any adversity. My grandmother further explained that I could always turn to the Bible and God for the answers I needed in life.

Since then, I have become a firm believer that no matter what you put your mind to, everyone is capable of achieving greatness. I understand that everyone may not have the same experiences in life.

When my grandmother gifted me my first Bible, she also taught me that with faith (in God) and in yourself, everyone has a gift and purpose in this life. You have to believe in you before anyone else will.

Rashad D. Thomasvice president of business connect and community outreach for the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee

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The best Christmas gift I ever received was the look on my daughter’s face when she opened her gifts at the age of 9. At Christmas time in previous years, I was a single mother with limited income, but my daughter never judged me for coming up short with gifts. That particular year, I decided to grow up, double down, and take a second job at Toys “R” Us in order to surprise her with more than the one standard gift. When she woke up on Christmas morning, there were so many toys, she didn’t know where to start. The look of surprise and appreciation on her face for that one moment in time said it all. So that Christmas, I received a double gift — teaching myself about what hard work yields, and the indescribable feeling of watching my hard work pay off with the person who mattered most.

Dorcas L. WilcoxCEO of Miami Bridge Youth and Family Services, Inc.

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My most memorable Christmas gift was the year I did not get one. A family in my hometown in rural Idaho suffered a house fire just a few week before the holidays; their home was destroyed and they lost everything. My mom decided we were going to “adopt” them and give them the gifts we would have received. At the age of 9, I thought it was a terrible idea. While the family was in Christmas Eve church services, we filled their van with the gifts, and then hid in our car across the parking lot so we could see them open their van and discover the gifts. They never knew who gave them those gifts. I still remember this experience and the lifelong impact it had in teaching me about generosity and giving.

Chelsea WilkersonCEO of Girl Scouts Tropical Florida

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CEOs Discuss Their Top Workforce Challenges for 2019

CEOs were asked: Heading into 2019, what do you see as the three biggest challenges for your company’s workforce?

1) Finding workers that are highly skilled and experienced is becoming an increasingly problematic endeavor in health care. We continue to search for nurses, physical therapists, and other care providers, and only see the competition becoming more intense to recruit and retain a high quality workforce; 2) The technology used in health care is becoming increasingly sophisticated, requiring robust training programs for our workforce and the need to recruit additional staff with appropriate experience with the electronic medical record and associated modules, including those related to telemedicine and apps used to care for our patients. 3) Finally, the basic nature of health care delivery is rapidly changing. Multidisciplinary and highly interactive teams are needed to provide high quality patient care. Forming and supporting high performing teams in both the inpatient and ambulatory settings is a major priority.

Dr. Edward Abraham, executive vice president for Health Affairs of the University of Miami and CEO of UHealth – the UM Health System

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We have had many challenges locating a large enough facility to accommodate up to 900 employees for our Call Center, and talent is extremely difficult. Secondly, our Cybersecurity Operational Center location has been chosen but again, technology talent in Miami is missing. To this point, we are recruiting and forced to relocate necessary professionals. Lastly, due to outrageous traffic and poor public transportation, we are evaluating changing our office schedule to 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Thursday, and three-day weekends.

Jim AngletonCEO for Aegis FinServ Corp.

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As a regional healthcare leader, Cleveland Clinic relies on the caliber of our workforce to deliver world-class care. The national nursing shortage is an industry-wide issue that we feel locally as well. As a teaching hospital, we embrace our role in educating the next generation of nurses. Second, the nature of healthcare delivery and the need for 24-hour access in certain settings can make work-life balance a challenge. Preventing caregiver burnout is a priority for us. Lastly, the high cost of living in South Florida coupled with low reimbursement rates for healthcare services can hamper talent recruitment for the region.

Wael BarsoumM.D., CEO and president of Cleveland Clinic Florida

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The biggest workforce challenges we face as a company in 2019 are complicated and not easily solvable. With unemployment now in the vicinity of 3.9 percent, merely competing for great talent is a monumental undertaking. Employees now have more choices than ever before and can choose occupations that offer a work-when-you-want option, higher wages, and more attractive soft benefits than ever. Retaining employees once you have attracted them is becoming increasingly more difficult as well. Combine attracting and retaining great people with the ever-changing shift of skills and only the strong will survive. We focus most of our marketing expenditures and HR efforts on making our company so fun and opportunistic that our people want to stay and grow, even though they might have a better option elsewhere.

Brett Beveridge, CEO and founder of The Revenue Optimization Companies (T-ROC)

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1) We are building a new community center and our ability to scale our company and maintain the awesome culture that we have created will be a challenge; 2) We are now one of the largest black-owned and operated nonprofits in town, and with Alonzo Mourning becoming a more savvy business person, we are working hard to create a sustainable business model based on creating a national model. We must continually reinvent ourselves and realize that we must remain a Best in Class nonprofit and no longer rely on the celebrity that the Mournings have always had; 3) Creating and enforcing policies that govern sophisticated and sustainable businesses will be something with which we will continue to grapple. With this new building, we will quickly double in size. Finding, recruiting and on-boarding new employees within our structure will be a challenge for which we must prepare.

Bill Diggspresident, The Mourning Family Foundation

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We’re going to have to continuously adapt to a changing competitive landscape, invest in the best recruiting, and retaining the best talent, and develop innovative ways to improve the client experience.

Jorge Gonzalezpresident and CEO, City National Bank

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I think the top three issues for our firm and our portfolio companies are (1) access to high technology talent, (2) convincing top performers around the world to move to South Florida, and (3) creating a culture to compete and win.

Louis Hernandez Jr., CEO of Black Dragon Capital

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I see something all banks face — continuing professional development and keeping up with the ever-evolving and more sophisticated banking regulations. Bankers must not only know the rules, they increasingly need to learn about and understand our customers’ business and their banking needs and trends. “Know your customer” should be more than a banking regulation. It should be the driving force in every customer relationship.

Agostinho Alfonso Macedopresident and CEO of Ocean Bank

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Our workforce, both attorney team members and support team members, will need to continue to invest substantial time and energy in implementing new technology in order to better and more efficiently serve our clients. We expect that our firm’s recently appointed Innovation Advisor will add value here. For our attorney team members, we will challenge ourselves to enhance our efficiency and productivity and make smart decisions regarding budgeting for our services and crafting alternative fee arrangements. Our Chief Legal Project Management and Pricing Officer is leading these efforts for us. And finally, we will continue to focus on the wellbeing and health of our team members at every level.

Paul Singermanco-chair of Berger Singerman

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Our employees are a microcosm of our community which is a microcosm of our country and as such, I assume most employees are concerned about higher quality education , affordable housing and security . Fortunately , our corporate offices are located in the North Dade area which rates pretty high in regard to school systems, affordable housing and security .

James “Jimmy” Tateco-owner and president of TKA-Evolution Apparel and of Tate Capital, and co-founder of Tate Development Corp.

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Heading into 2019, the three biggest challenges that the Miami Orange Bowl Host Committee workforce faces are competing for higher minimum wages that are comparable to similar cities, the current plan to upgrade the service industry into more high-end professional and secure jobs, and coping with retention rates due to the need for more affordable housing to meet the demand of an increased workforce. In order to grow the company’s workforce, future employees need to have access to adequate housing, transportation, and safe communities.

Rashad D. Thomasvice president of business connect and community outreach for the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee

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1) The biggest challenge for our company’s workforce shall be the impact of U.S. trade agreements with China, as these will directly affect our construction material costs, which can increase substantially. 2) The unfortunate natural disasters, such as hurricanes and floods, in Florida and surrounding states drives skilled construction workers to those devastated areas, making it more difficult and costly for labor in south Florida. 3) Technology adaptability to our construction work force, who have not necessarily utilized field technology in the construction building process. We have plans on iPads on-site, digital construction cameras, virtual team meetings, and online field productivity tracking, which was not customary five years or even two years ago, and now it is our standard for construction.

Manny Angelo Varaspresident and CEO of MV Construction Group

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Working with at-risk youth can be challenging, stressful and sometimes even dangerous. We must find and train dedicated and compassionate employees who are able to deal with issues that affect today’s teens, e.g., being sexually trafficked, gang affiliations, domestic violence, gun control and bullying, especially for our LGBTQ youth. Budget cuts at the local, state, and federal level threaten the very bane of our existence, as 60 percent of our agency’s budget is dependent on government funding, and private funding is so competitive in a South Florida market with 600+ local charities. Maintaining exceptional, professional staff through competitive wages in the not-for-profit world, coupled with unaffordable housing in South Florida, is a huge challenge.

Dorcas L. WilcoxCEO of Miami Bridge Youth & Family Services

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The challenges for our workforce and volunteers at Girl Scouts of Tropical Florida continue to be high cost of living, increasing transportation gridlock, and the cost of medical/health insurance. These are not new challenges, they are issues that seem to get worse year over year. We strive to find creative and new solutions to these issues, however, we feel the impacts of these challenges daily.

Chelsea WilkersonCEO of Girl Scouts Tropical Florida

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Recession ahead? CEO’s Divided on Whether They See Signs of One

Healthcare continues to grow as a major part of the economy. We have not been seeing any signs of a recession, which is why we continue to take steps to build our clinical programs. There is a great need to provide accessible specialty healthcare services for our community and the region.

Dr. Edward Abraham, executive vice president for Health Affairs of the University of Miami and CEO of UHealth – the UM Health System

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I see the warning signs in the real estate sector already — certain retailers going dark; slowdown in purchasing will cause more employee layoffs in the future. The cost of living plus inflation has increased but [am] wondering if it will sustain or roll back. Fed interest rate increases are not helping.

Jim AngletonCEO for Aegis FinServ Corp.

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Historically, recessions have a delayed impact on healthcare providers because of access to healthcare benefits post-layoff through COBRA. We are not seeing any early signs of a recession. Cleveland Clinic Florida maintains the highest acute-care occupancy rates in the region.

Wael BarsoumM.D., CEO and president

of Cleveland Clinic Florida

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We do not see any signs of a recession in our business or industry. To the contrary, we are fortunate that we will have our seventh consecutive record in 2018 and are poised for an even better 2019. The recent volatility in the stock market and global events does raise concerns about our future economy. We have plans in place and are prepared to not only survive but thrive when a recession eventually comes.

Brett Beveridge, CEO and founder of The Revenue Optimization Companies (T-ROC)

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We are in the nonprofit space. Our businesses feel slowdown first as it shows up in reduced giving. We have not seen any signs of it yet.

Bill Diggspresident, The Mourning Family Foundation

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I definitely see some retreating of prices in the commercial real estate market, as many investors chasing yield overpaid for assets that are not supported by rental income. However, since the term “recession” has a specific definition — two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth — I am not prepared or qualified to say that those are signs of an impending recession.

Jessica Goldman SrebnickCEO of Goldman Properties and Goldman Global Arts

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Luckily, South Florida has experienced steady economic growth for nearly a decade, and the metrics continue to be positive. Undoubtedly this streak will come to an end, but when the next economic downturn comes, it should not be as bad as the last one, because the fundamentals have changed – larger and more diverse investment base, greater liquidity and more equity, particularly in the real estate market.

Jorge Gonzalezpresident and CEO, City National Bank

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We are concerned about retention and wage inflation, rising housing costs in some regions, and competition for hiring. In other regions, we are seeing a softening of the housing markets, continued high wage inflation that is likely unsustainable, and increased volatility in buying patterns in certain technology areas created by market disruption from accelerated digitation.

Louis Hernandez Jr., CEO of Black Dragon Capital

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At Ocean Bank we see a slowdown in loans and new business due to increased interest rates. The difference from earlier cycles is that banks are observing stricter guidelines on collateral, pre-purchase or pre-leasing and greater borrower equity in development projects.

Agostinho Alfonso Macedopresident and CEO of Ocean Bank

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I don’t see a major recession on the horizon (barring any unforeseen material external factors), but what I do see is an economic plateau with ebbs and flows. One key point to keep in mind is that our economy has experienced a major paradigm shift which has radically altered the economic markers historically used to predict the economic future. Economies are now global in scale, meaning many of the economic equations must be rewritten whereby new variables and constants are identified and defined before any definitive forecasts can be made. Hence, when things don’t make sense, I go back to the basics: Barriers to entry, Supply Side Economics and available cash on the sidelines ready to invest. Based upon these basics, I do not see a bad recession in the immediate future.

James “Jimmy” Tateco-owner and president of TKA-Evolution Apparel and of Tate Capital, and co-founder of Tate Development Corp.

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One of the many signs of forecasting a recession is the rise in the unemployment rate. In the past year, we have seen unprecedented unemployment rates hit all-time lows and highs. Earlier in 2018, the unemployment rate rose to 4%, after dropping to an 18-year low of 3.8% in May. The number of people who were unemployed also grew by half a million. The fluctuation in unemployment is a sign consistent with an economy that is entering the late stages of the business cycle where businesses cease to expand, the GDP diminishes for two consecutive quarters, the rate of unemployment rises and housing prices decline.

Rashad D. Thomasvice president of business connect and community outreach for the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee

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I see a lot of confidence in the economy at this time and especially in foreign investors entering the south Florida market. So I do not see a recession anytime in the near future.

Manny Angelo Varaspresident and CEO of MV Construction Group

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Today we see everyday people working hard, but still struggling to live the American dream of home ownership. More college graduates than ever are moving back home because they can’t afford to pay for apartment living and at the same time repay student loans with today’s living wages. If the push continues for a desperately needed $15 minimum wage, it will surely negatively affect smaller companies that will not be prepared and able to meet those standards.

Dorcas L. WilcoxCEO of Miami Bridge Youth & Family Services

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No, we are not yet seeing signs of a recession. We’ve had a positive year in fundraising and membership growth; and anticipate an increase in the Girl Scout cookie program this year! However, in anticipation of a possible recession, we are taking measures to be prepared by focusing on growing our membership and increasing our financial reserves.

Chelsea WilkersonCEO of Girl Scouts Tropical Florida

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CEO’s Thoughts on Amazon’s HQ2 in Miami

 

CEOs were asked: Amazon chose to go elsewhere than South Florida/Miami for its HQ2, but the deals in N.Y. and Virginia are being heavily criticized. In hindsight, is this too bad or a relief/good riddance for us?

Our South Florida business environment is vibrant and growing at a rapid pace. The inclusion of Amazon in the mix would have been a wonderful addition and would have accelerated our growth. Nonetheless, South Florida is recognized as a great place to live and do business, and will continue to grow its reputation as a prime locale for technology and consumer oriented enterprise.

Dr. Edward Abraham, executive vice president for Health Affairs of the University of Miami and CEO of UHealth – the UM Health System

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Miami is perfect for the Amazon Prime Distribution Center but not a key contender for Prime HQ. Was nice to be considered but, Miami suffers from lack of talent, housing, and it has commuting issues, therefore the moves to those cities made perfect sense to us. In this case, too bad, but we’re not ready.

Jim AngletonCEO for Aegis FinServ Corp.

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Amazon’s decision is neither good nor bad for South Florida. Our region has a lot to offer – culture, diversity, economic vitality and global positioning. The opportunity will be embraced by another.

Wael BarsoumM.D., CEO and president of Cleveland Clinic Florida

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There are pros and cons for “winning” this competition. I am a massive believer in South Florida as a premier location for any business big or small. We are ideally located geographically from a global perspective. We have a unique and diverse culture. We benefit from fantastic weather, all professional sports teams, world-class museums and performing arts venues, world-renowned events like the Super Bowl, Orange Bowl, and Art Basel Miami Beach, and no state income tax. One of our concerns is our overloaded infrastructure. We all feel the congestion of our airports, the challenges with our ports and everyday old traffic jams, any time of day. As a community, we need not only to continue to attract entrepreneurs and small businesses but also grow big businesses in South Florida for us to be competitive and thrive long term. When Amazon decided to go elsewhere, we kicked the can down the road on dealing with our infrastructure issues, but we haven’t solved them. I am disappointed that we were not able to win this bid but have confidence that it is only a matter of time before other Fortune 500 companies take notice and locate their headquarters here in South Florida.

Brett Beveridge, CEO and founder of The Revenue Optimization Companies (T-ROC)

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It is always unfortunate when we lose business to other cities and regions. Over the years, we have lost many business opportunities that can really transform this city into a real business hub. It is part and parcel of a bigger issue. Those issues/solutions are a more robust public transportation system, affordable workforce housing and a more educated and diverse local workforce.

Bill Diggspresident, The Mourning Family Foundation

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I think regions benefit when more technology based jobs become part of their economic base. While many are concerned about giving economic benefits to large and profitable companies, these industries bring high paying positions and provide a positive economic impact in the form of consumer spending, home sales, restaurants, entertainment, car sales, and other services. And they attract or spawn other high-tech businesses, further accelerating economic benefits. Altogether, they can dramatically enhance the economic buying power and standard of living in a region.

Louis Hernandez Jr., CEO of Black Dragon Capital

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Amazon HQ2 would have been beneficial for Miami — the jobs, the bump in housing demand, the direct effect on retail sales and sales tax, and the overall economic impact. I am a supporter of the Beacon Council and its mission to recruit businesses to relocate and expand in Miami-Dade County. I’m sorry to see Amazon go elsewhere.

Agostinho Alfonso Macedopresident and CEO of Ocean Bank

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I assume the South Florida committee responsible for making a presentation to Amazon for their new HQ2 performed a well-vetted cost-benefit analysis prior to making any formal bids. On the surface, the NY & Va. bid looks outlandish but it’s hard to say for sure without truly understanding the economics of the proposals that were ultimately accepted. All we’re hearing at this point is white noise.

I believe rolling out the proverbial red carpet is worth the trouble when there’s a possibility to attract a corporation with the scale and impact of an Amazon.

James “Jimmy” Tateco-owner and president of TKA-Evolution Apparel and of Tate Capital, and co-founder of Tate Development Corp.

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After being named amongst the top 20 finalists as the city to be chosen, it is a win-win situation for South Florida not to be selected as the second headquarters for Amazon. Amazon chose to split the second headquarters between New York City and the Washington, D.C., suburb of Arlington, Virginia. Together they will divide up the 50,000 high-paying jobs the online retail giant is expected to bring. Miami and South Florida is now a city for other businesses to consider when looking to expand into new locations. There are many benefits to being viewed as the underdog.

Rashad D. Thomasvice president of business connect and community outreach for the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee

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I strongly believe Amazon made a mistake in not selecting Miami for HQ2. The site amazon passed in Miami neighbored Paramount Miami World Center which is the most remarkable development in the United states and Miami is the gateway to the americas and I am surprised they did not select Miami and I believe that is a regrettable decision.

Manny Angelo Varaspresident and CEO of MV Construction Group

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I believe it’s too bad for us. For the past two decades, Miami has become a mecca for new ideas, populations and a booming economy. Building and expansion has taken South Florida to new heights. Since many businesses have striven to pay the living wage of $13.44 in Miami-Dade County, the offer of Amazon to pay a minimum of $15 per hour would have been a positive step in the right direction. Even if South Florida closed the deal and it wasn’t totally successful, we should never be afraid to go after business deals that could potentially boost our economy and create job expansion

Dorcas L. WilcoxCEO of Miami Bridge Youth & Family Services

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Congratulations to NY and Virginia on their successful bid for HQ2; time will tell the merit of the investment. For South Florida, this is a good opportunity to reflect on the workforce and infrastructure development required so we will be viable candidates for future investments of this scale. We must continue to develop a 21st century workforce – one that ensures equal access and pay equity for women in all industries.

Chelsea WilkersonCEO of Girl Scouts Tropical Florida

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Merchandising Spotlight: Interactive Retail Displays

 

Merchandising Spotlight: Interactive Retail Displays

Walk into most any major department store, and you can’t miss it. Customers gathered around an interactive display or kiosk. What’s the attraction? For starters, they’re fun, captivating and entertaining. Interactive displays give customers to opportunity to see what your product looks like in action, customize a product, or even buy it on the spot. Customers are drawn to them because of the need to touch, feel and experience products before they buy them. Interactive displays have the opportunity to engage customers in a way that static displays can’t.

Here are a few tips to getting the most out of your interactive display.

Keep your message on brand and up-to-date.

Keep your messaging clear and consistent. You want customers to remember not just the cool bells and whistles of the interactive experience but your product and the brand. And make sure that you have a retail associate tasked with updating the display to reflect price changes, special promotions and keeping it fully operational.

Have a clear call to action.

What do you want customers to do? Print out what the specifications of the product they just tried, with clear directions as to where to find it in the store? Place an order? Find an associate to assist with their purchase? Once you’ve captured their attention, ensure that it’s clear what you want customers to do next.

Make sure you have the right staffing

There’s no question that retailers are facing a labor shortage. With a healthy economy and low employment, it’s a challenge to find qualified retail merchandisers with the technical expertise to set-up, maintain and monitor interactive displays, which are becoming increasingly complex. Working with a company like T-ROC, which has a national network of retail merchandisers, ensures that you have a team of retail experts at the ready.

T-ROC offers fully integrated, cost-effective merchandising solutions, including new-store set-up, display builds, Planogram maintenance, compliance audits, new product introduction, retail analysis, product fulfillment and much more. T-ROC’s merchandising solutions are part of a comprehensive suite of services that provide a full end-to-end sales solution that enables manufacturers and retailers to fulfill all their sales performance needs.